Film

Let’s Talk About Movies:

Mise-en-scène - Proxemic Patterns

Film: Persona (19668)
Dir. Ingmar Bergman

Proxemic patterns is the relationships of organisms within a given space—can be influenced by external considerations. Proxemic patterns are perfectly obvious to anyone who has bothered to observe the way people obey certain spatial conventions in actual life. But in movies, these patterns are also related to the shots and their distance ranges. Although shots are not always defined by the literal space between the camera and the object photographed, in terms of psychological effect, shots tend to suggest physical distances.

Each proxemicpattern has an approximate camera equivalent. The intimate distances, for example, can be likened to the close and extreme close shot ranges. The personal distance is approximately a medium close range. The social distances correspond to the medium and full shot ranges. And the public distances are roughly within the long and extreme long shot ranges. Because our eyes identify with the camera’s lens, in effect we are placed within these ranges vis-à-vis the subject matter. When we are offered a close-up of a character, for example, in a sense we feel that we’re in an intimate relationship with that character. In some instances, this technique can bind us to the character, forcing us to care about her and to identify with her problems.

Throughout this scene, which contains no dialogue, Bergman uses space to communicate his ideas—the space within the frame and the space implied between the camera (us) and the subject. 

  1. The character is in a hospital room watching the news on television.
  2. Suddenly, she sees a horrifying scene of a Buddhist monk setting himself on fire to protest the war in Vietnam. She retreats to the corner of the room.
  3. Bergman then cuts to a closer shot, intensifying our emotional involvement.
  4. The full horror of her reaction is conveyed by the extreme close-up, forcing us into an intimate proximity with her.
via caryfuckmenowa · originally by cinematicfantastic

Harmony Korine’s foreword he wrote for Werner Herzog: A Guide for the Perplexed

Harmony Korine’s foreword he wrote for Werner Herzog: A Guide for the Perplexed

via pawsthomasanderson · originally by thefilmstage

color palettes of movies written & directed by harmony korine

zimbofilms:

Werner Herzog in Harmony Korine’s Julien Donkey-Boy (1999)

officerserpico:

Open up and let the Devil in

via rossbirks · originally by officerserpico

oldfilmsflicker:

Children of Men, 2006 (dir. Alfonso Cuarón)

via pawsthomasanderson · originally by oldfilmsflicker
brightwalldarkroom:

"Never try to convey your idea to the audience - it is a thankless and senseless task. Show them life, and they’ll find within themselves the means to assess and appreciate it."
—Andrei Tarkovsky

brightwalldarkroom:

"Never try to convey your idea to the audience - it is a thankless and senseless task. Show them life, and they’ll find within themselves the means to assess and appreciate it."

—Andrei Tarkovsky

via jackcardiffs · originally by brightwalldarkroom
posted 1 day ago with 351 notes

jacques-audiard:

Laurence Anyways (2012) 

via harryrossicinephile · originally by jacques-audiard
posted 1 day ago with 407 notes

matt-mess:

Gummo, Harmony Korine, 1997

via harryrossicinephile · originally by matt-mess
posted 1 day ago with 814 notes

filmdoms:

hiding tonight

via firths · originally by filmdoms

After Hayao Miyazaki learned that he will receive an Academy Governors Award, he released a humble statement: “Honestly, I don’t think there’s any need to give awards to people who have retired, but nonetheless, it is an honor.”

After Hayao Miyazaki learned that he will receive an Academy Governors Award, he released a humble statement: “Honestly, I don’t think there’s any need to give awards to people who have retired, but nonetheless, it is an honor.”

via andreii-tarkovsky · originally by preludetowind.com
posted 1 day ago with 990 notes

As long as I resist you, I live. If I win, you set me free.

Det sjunde inseglet (1957) dir. Ingmar Bergman

via andreii-tarkovsky · originally by alsk00
benorsomethingiguess asked: "top 5 90s films, bands/artists, and films from asia (the continent, not just japan/china/korea/taiwan)"

90s film

Bands/Artists

Films from Asia

posted 2 days ago with 7 notes

The 400 Blows (1959)

via frenchcinema · originally by chungkingexpress1994